Three things you can do now that will help you achieve more tomorrow – and in the future.

| April 30, 2012

Often we think we are too swamped to stop and make even a tiny change that could benefit us in the long run. So we keep running forward and our goals keep running ahead of us at the same speed!

However profitable growth expert Hilary Briggs from R2P Ltd recommends taking just five minutes today to make tomorrow (and the next day!) better.

Early in her career, Hilary Briggs, found herself in the role of Production Superintendent, responsible for over 80 people working on the door build for the Rover 800 at Rover Group’s Cowley Assembly plant.

“I was running round like a headless chicken, desperately juggling problems of all shapes and sizes from quality issues and parts supply to people challenges. My colleagues seemed to be doing much the same. At the time I was working closely with Honda, and it struck me that there seemed to be much more calmness in their approach; I vowed to create some of that in my section.” explains Hilary.

One of the techniques Hilary found very useful was the idea of taking five minutes today to make tomorrow better. She decided to commit to five minutes every day. Admittedly sometimes it was tough, but very soon she could see the results, and taking five minutes became easier and easier.

Now Hilary recommends all her clients give themselves five minutes each day dedicated simply to making tomorrow better.

For example, one client spent five minutes one day setting up some rules for her email inbox so that mail was automatically sorted. That five minutes today made every tomorrow much easier for her.

Another decided to look three months ahead (rather than just at tomorrow) and identified a few areas that he knew would need dealing with then and could be pre-planned. Over the next few days he spent five minutes each day delegating certain tasks, giving people plenty of notice of what would be needed. Over the course of a couple of weeks using the five minutes a day rule he saved him, and his staff, considerable stress (and time) further down the line!

Hilary has continued to use this technique regularly over the years. “Some days I manage more that five minutes and some days I manage none at all – however the forward momentum builds up and that feeds the positive feeling with its own reinforcement. Very soon you’ll be feeling better and the problems will be smaller, and most important of all you’ve set a pattern that will help prevent new problems and crises appearing in the future.”

Here is Hilary’s five minute advice:

1) Take five minutes today to write down a couple of simple actions you could take that would help move you forward.

They can be as simple as one phone call, five minutes researching something online, or spending five minutes over a coffee jotting down more ideas for your long term vision of your life / business.

2) If the actions on your list feel too big, break them down into manageable five minute junks.

3) Tackle one five minute chunk per day.

4) And do the same the next day, and again the day after that.

5) If you miss a day, don’t beat yourself up, just re-commit to five minutes the next day. Don’t try to increase it to ten minutes to make up for yesterday – just stick to five minutes.

In just five minutes each day and very soon the forward momentum you create will have a life of its own – by the end of the week you’ll see a difference (and you’ll probably feel different too).

“Five minutes today to make tomorrow better” is part of the “Deliver Results in 100 Days” programme from Hilary Briggs, available free from her website: http://hilarybriggs.co.uk/resources/deliver-results-100-days/

Category: Opinions & commentaries

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