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Women are happier at work than men despite being paid less, according to Gender Happiness Gap

The Gender Happiness Gap research today surveyed over 1200 UK employees about their happiness, enthusiasm, pride, and efficiency at work. The results demonstrate a significant gap in the workplace happiness between men and women across the UK.

The research shows that contrary to, and perhaps in spite of the fact that the Gender Pay Gap tends to favour men, happiness at work tends to fall in favour of female staff: that is to say, men are much less happy in the workplace than their female counterparts.

Whilst 77% of PAYE female employees are happy at work at least some of the time, the figure is only 66% for men. This means that one in three men are rarely or never happy at work.

The case is similar when looking at the total workforce: 45% of female staff stated that they’re happy most of the time at work, versus only 38% of male staff. Amongst women, the 30-49-year-old age group is the unhappiest age group, which may be due to juggling family life alongside working commitments.

Enthusiasm at work increases with seniority for both genders, but in a similar way that the gender pay gap compounds as an employee’s career progresses – as does the enthusiasm gap. 37% of frontline female employees report feeling enthusiastic about work often / most of the time versus only 30% of male frontline employees. By the time women reach the top of their organisation, as directors or company owners, 70% are enthusiastic about their job often / most of the time, versus only half of male company owners and directors.

Key highlights from the Gender Happiness Gap include

 Happiness in the workplace

  • 45% of female staff are happy most of the time / often versus only 38% of men.
  • The unhappiest women by age group are 30-49-year olds with 1 in 4 saying they never or rarely feel happy at work.
  • Men appear to be unhappy at work irrespective of age, with 1 in 3 across all age ranges never or rarely feeling happy at work.
  • Over a third of PAYE men are rarely or never happy at work, whereas under a quarter of PAYE women feel the same.

 Enthusiasm about your job

  • Women appear to naturally more enthusiastic about their work with more women than men reporting that they are enthusiastic about their job most of the time (44% women versus only 35% men).
  • 37% of frontline female employees reporting feeling enthusiastic about work often / most of the time versus only 30% of male frontline employees.
  • By the time women reach the top of their organisation as director or company owner 70% are enthusiastic about their job often / most of the time, versus only half of male company owners and directors.

 Proud of what you do

  • 100% of female contractors felt proud of what they do at least some of the time, in stark contrast to only 60% of male contractors feeling the same.
  • Women feel more pride in what they do at work versus men, irrespective of age and employment type (employed, contracting or self-employed).
  • Male pride in their work appears to increase with seniority in the business, with 14% more managers and team leaders feeling pride in their work often / most of the time versus male frontline employees. Whereas female pride in their work remains steady regardless of whether they are a manager or frontline employee.

Feeling your job is important and worthwhile

  • 95% of professional women feel their job is important and worthwhile at least some of the time (with 72% feeling this often / most of the time). In contrast, only 78% of male professionals feel their job is worthwhile at least some of the time (with less than half feeling their job is important and worthwhile often / most of the time).
  • More than half (60%) of male contractors rarely or almost never feel their job is important or worthwhile, versus only 17% of female contractors.

 Working as efficiently as possible

  • At first glance both genders seem to feel similarly about their efficiency at work, with 50% men and 53% women feeling they are working as efficiently as possible often / most of the time.
  • However as both genders move into more senior positions, their view on how efficiently they are working begins to diverge. With 1 in 3 male senior managers and department heads saying they never or rarely feel they are working as efficiently as possible, versus only 1 in 4 female senior managers and department heads saying the same.
  • 73% of male frontline employees feel they are working efficiently at least some of the time, while 84% of female frontline employees feel they are working efficiently at least some of the time.